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16:05 

Beats and Football


@темы: videos

16:03 

Nouns + prepositions

21:40 

it may be not as foreign as you think


@темы: languages, English, videos

13:51 

"Lamb to the Slaughter" by Roald Dahl (1916-1990)

Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl (1916-1990)

Word Count: 3899

The room was warm and clean, the curtains drawn, the two table lamps alight-hers and the one by the empty chair opposite. On the sideboard behind her, two tall glasses, soda water, whiskey. Fresh ice cubes in the Thermos bucket.

Mary Maloney was waiting for her husband to come him from work.

Now and again she would glance up at the clock, but without anxiety, merely to please herself with the thought that each minute gone by made it nearer the time when he would come. There was a slow smiling air about her, and about everything she did. The drop of a head as she bent over her sewing was curiously tranquil. Her skin -for this was her sixth month with child-had acquired a wonderful translucent quality, the mouth was soft, and the eyes, with their new placid look, seemed larger darker than before. When the clock said ten minutes to five, she began to listen, and a few moments later, punctually as always, she heard the tires on the gravel outside, and the car door slamming, the footsteps passing the window, the key turning in the lock. She laid aside her sewing, stood up, and went forward to kiss him as he came in.

"Hullo darling," she said.

"Hullo darling," he answered.

She took his coat and hung it in the closer. Then she walked over and made the drinks, a strongish one for him, a weak one for herself; and soon she was back again in her chair with the sewing, and he in the other, opposite, holding the tall glass with both hands, rocking it so the ice cubes tinkled against the side.

читать дальше

@темы: Reading, English

13:43 

Reported Speech

www.engames.eu/reported-speech-grammar-explanat...

There is mind map describing the basic rules, a video and two games to practise the grammar.

@темы: ESL, English, Grammar, links

22:48 

community.eflclassroom.com/group/lessons-in-a-c...

This lesson is low level and revolves around an amazing video: SplitScreen. The video is all about one day in a man/woman's life, shown with splitscreens.

@темы: videos, links, Vocabulary, English, ESL

22:59 

10 Words Every Book Lover Should Know

10 Words Every Book Lover Should Know

The word for a book-lover is a 'bibliophile,' a word first recorded in print -- according to the Oxford English Dictionary -- in 1824. Alternatively, there is the word 'bookworm,' which is of an altogether older pedigree: it first appears in 1580. (The poet and playwright Ben Jonson went on to use it in one of his plays, a satire which bears the pleasing title of Cynthia's Revels, or The Fountain of Self-Love.) But what words should every good bibliophile and bookworm know? Here are some of my favorites.

Well, if you like words, you're probably guilty of EPEOLATRY, which means 'the worship of words.' This word first appears in an 1860 book by Oliver Wendell Holmes Senior. If you consider yourself an educated or 'lettered' person, you might be described as a LITERARIAN, a word adopted from the French in the 18th century and probably modeled on similar words such as 'librarian' and 'antiquarian.'

Some people consider themselves highly educated and lettered literarians, but in fact they are often ULTRACREPIDARIAN -- a word which refers to someone who gives an opinion on things s/he knows nothing about. This rather useful word is first recorded in a letter of 1819 written by influential critic William Hazlitt (indeed, he applies the word 'ultracrepidarian' to a critic here in its inaugural use). This word also has an interesting etymology: it literally means 'beyond the sole,' an allusion to a story involving the ancient Greek painter Apelles. According to Pliny the Elder, a cobbler criticised Apelles' painting of a shoe, stating that it was inaccurate. Apelles promptly redid the painting. The cobbler, spurred on by the effect his first criticism had had upon the artist, proceeded to criticise the way Apelles had painted the leg above the shoe. But this was too much for Apelles, who reportedly warned the cobbler, 'Let the shoemaker venture no further.' The cheeky cobbler had ventured 'beyond the sole' -- i.e., beyond his own field of expertise. (This story is doubly apt, given that ultracrepidarians often talk a load of cobblers.)

Another word for this sort of person, whom you may overhear mouthing off about books, films, politics, or, indeed, anything at the next table in the pub or the coffee house, is MOROSOPH. A 'morosoph' is a would-be philosopher -- a fool who thinks he's clever than he is. The word comes from the French writer Rabelais, where the 'moro-' is from the Greek meaning 'dull' or 'stupid' and the '-soph' from the Greek for 'wise.' Morosophs are foolish for thinking themselves so wise.

If you're not only an avid reader, but one of those people who simply cannot leave the house without a tome stashed in your pocket or bag, then it may interest you to know that Scottish novelist and poet Sir Walter Scott coined the phrase BOOK-BOSOMED to describe someone who carries a book at all times. The phrase first appears in Scott's celebrated 1805 poem The Lay of the Last Minstrel.

However, beware you don't get accused of overdoing the books: BIBLIOBIBULI was American humorist H. L. Mencken's coinage, and it refers to people who read too much. Is there such a thing as reading too much? Well, Mencken thought so: 'There are some people who read too much: the bibliobibuli. I know some who are constantly drunk on books, as other men are drunk on whiskey or religion. They wander through this most diverting and stimulating of worlds in a haze, seeing nothing and hearing nothing.'

Perhaps now would be a good time to head to the library and view the INCUNABULA. This word can be used generally to mean something in its early stages; however, it also specifically means any book printed before 1500 -- that is, in the early stages of printing. 'Incunabula' comes from the Latin for 'swaddling-clothes.'

If you've read this far, the chances are you're a voracious reader, someone who might be described as a BIBLIOPHAGIST -- literally, a devourer of books.

I'll leave you with my own suggestion, BIBLIOSMIA -- meaning the act of smelling books, especially as a way of getting a 'fix' from the aroma of old tomes. Let's get this coinage out there -- I reckon there are more bibliosmiacs out there than many people would realise. It's time we stood up, book in hand, to be counted.

(c)

@темы: English, articles, links

22:46 

General links

en.linguistadores.com/en/
Learn new vocabulary by reading and listening to articles and videos selected according to your level. You can click on words as you read to translate them to the language you have chosen, then save them to word lists.
статьи по уровням, музыка, видео, слова :heart::heart::heart::heart::heart:

@темы: general links, English, ESL, links

22:37 

The Best Way to Learn a Foreign Language Is the Opposite of the Usual Way

The Best Way to Learn a Foreign Language Is the Opposite of the Usual Way

This article is by Katharine B. Nielson, the chief education officer at Voxy, a language-learning company based in New York City.

The renowned Mexican author Carlos Fuentes once remarked that America’s monolingualism is a great paradox: We’re the dominant world power, yet also the world’s most linguistically isolated one. The numbers appear to bear this out. Roughly 17% of U.S. citizens can speak more than one language, compared with 54% of Europeans. Stanford Professor Russell A. Berman, former president of the Modern Language Association, has warned that the U.S. is quickly becoming a nation of “second language illiterates.”

If we can’t communicate with the rest of the world, our businesses lose opportunities, and our citizens lose jobs to global graduates who have the language skills we lack. Often the solution is presented as one of resources—if we simply divert more time and money to language instruction, we can finally cure the U.S. of its seemingly permanent dependence on English.

However, the problem runs far deeper than resources; it’s that as a nation we still don’t know how to teach language effectively. The curriculum for nearly every introductory language class revolves around grammatical concepts, and we spend far too much time on the rules of language. As a result, students are forced to suffer through grammar-focused instruction that makes them adept at conjugating verbs but leaves them mute when they are pressed to have a conversation. What they need instead is the chance to use language the way it was intended, as a tool for communication, not as a complex set of rules to master.

Europeans have seen the writing on the wall, and in recent years a popular language teaching methodology has grown up in many countries called “content and language integrated learning.” The idea: Use foreign languages to teach non-language subjects. Early research indicates that this is effective at fostering an environment that leads to impressive language learning.

Drawing on a similar approach, in 2006, U.S. Customs and Border Protection did away with the grammar-based Spanish course required of its agents-in-training and replaced it with a curriculum centered on teaching specific, job-related tasks in Spanish. The resulting improvements were dramatic. Not only did the agents get the language skills they needed to perform their jobs more effectively, but even though the new course did not follow a grammar-based syllabus, their grammar was better too.

These results just add to the growing body of research indicating that if we want to improve outcomes, we should fundamentally reevaluate how we teach foreign languages in our schools. We might start by rethinking the concept of language classes altogether. For instance, instead of having isolated courses called “Spanish” or “Arabic,” we should disperse language instruction across the curriculum. One way to achieve this and at the same time make language learning more engaging, would be to send younger students to specialty classes, such as music, art, or gym, taught in a foreign language.

Then when they reached high school, they would be in a position to benefit from additional specialty or elective courses that used foreign languages to teach anything from drama to home economics, allowing us to do away with the outdated, segregated model of language instruction that still dominates secondary education while still preparing interested students for advanced study of literature and culture.

At the same time, doing so would open up opportunities for schools with large populations of students whose first language is not English. Instead of treating them as an expensive problem to solve, we could take advantage of their native language expertise in specialty classes and electives, turning them into a valuable part of our solution.

Helping Americans move beyond English should be a top priority, but we won’t see the outcomes we need until we abandon approaches that don’t work. By de-emphasizing the focus on language itself, we may actually improve our acquisition of it, because when we stop trying to teach people about what they are saying and just start expecting them to say it, we will see far better results.

(c)

@темы: English, articles, languages

20:15 

General links

www.multimedia-english.com/



MULTIMEDIA-ENGLISH is a video-tube website designed to help you learn real English while having fun and offers good quality resources for teachers too, including a free Virtual Classroom. It uses authentic material to show you how real English is, mostly videos with transcriptions and explanations and interactive activities to help you assimilate the language. This site offers video pages for all levels, from beginners to advanced, including a section for kids and also for absolute beginners, plus a grammar section and also interactive activities to practise. Teachers can also create a Virtual Classroom to work with their students online. So what are you waiting for, don't just sit to study English, get into life through real English and enjoy it all the way.

*****
designerlessons.org/

"The “designer lessons” aim to elicit natural language in order to create a dialogic relationship between the teacher and the learner. In other words, we believe that student motivation is highest in a class where the students have opportunities to take the lead while the teacher guides, resulting in a co-creation of language in an environment that encourages both freedom of expression and the free-flow of student-led questions."

@темы: general links, English, ESL, links

20:00 

English Isn't As Easy As You Think))

You think English is easy?

1) The bandage was wound around the wound.

2) The farm was used to produce produce.

3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.

4) We must polish the Polish furniture..

5) He could lead if he would get the lead out.

6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert..

7) Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.

8) A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.

9) When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

10) I did not object to the object.

11) The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

12) There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.

13) They were too close to the door to close it.

14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.

15) A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.

16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.

17) The wind was too strong to wind the sail.

18) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear..

19) I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

20) How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?



Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant, nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France . Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth, beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices? Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend? If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat? Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what language do people recite at a play and play at a recital? Ship by truck and send cargo by ship? Have noses that run and feet that smell?

How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites? You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off by going on.

English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all. That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible.

(c)
запись создана: 24.04.2014 в 14:22

@темы: links, languages, joking, English, videos

21:33 

www.quill.org/
Quill provides interactive grammar lessons.

Learn English grammar by writing sentences and proofreading passages.

it starts with proof reading: there are 9 mistakes
Shackleton Returns from the Antarctic
In 1914, Ernest Shackleton set of on an exploration across the Antarctic. In 1915 his ship, Endurance, became trapped in the ice, and it's crew was stuck. Ten months later there ship sank, and Shackletons crew was forced to live on a iceberg. They reached Elephant Island in april of 1916 using three lifeboats.

Shackleton promised to found help. In a small boat with five crew members, he spent 16 days crossing 800 miles of ocean. The remaining men were then rescued on August of 1916. Amazingly, Shackleton did not loose anyone on the trip.

@темы: links, general links, English

00:09 

Vocabulary videos

23:10 

General links

www.esldiscussions.com/
13,400 English Conversation Questions
* 670 discussion topic handouts - That's a lot of discussion!
* Everyday themes and more controversial issues.
* Ready-to-print Word and PDF downloads.
my love for ever))):heart::heart::heart:

***

www.eslflow.com/Tourismlessons.html и www.eslflow.com/Socialtrendslessons.html
ESLTeaching Lesson Links

***

www.michellehenry.fr/default.htm
некий французский сайт для изучающих английский, много разных ссылок
оттуда:
список ресурсов по лексическим темам
список ресурсов по грамматике

***

English lessons and exercises
там же:
10,837 tests
3 levels - beginners, intermediate, advanced
a lot of grammar and vocabulary exercises
из минусов - сложно искать, проблема с сортировкой

***

ESL vocabulary building exercises

***
pearltrees.com по теме English - www.pearltrees.com/#/N-u=1_489870&N-p=36894756&...

***

www.easypacelearning.com/
Learning Basic English, to Advanced Over 700 On-Line Lessons and Exercises Free

***
British Counsil
esol.britishcouncil.org/dictations/important-te...
learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/magazine/m...

***

www.engames.eu/town-vocabulary/
haven't had enough time but looks really nice
запись создана: 23.04.2014 в 19:22

@темы: topics, links, general links, exercises, English, ESL, словари

23:07 

Make or Do?


@темы: English, Vocabulary

22:33 

Как отличить частицу от других частей речи

Многие частицы совпадают по форме со словами других частей речи – прилагательными, местоимениями и наречиями.

Отличить их можно по тому, что частицы, как и другие служебные части речи, не обозначают:

признаки, свойства и качества лиц и явлений, как прилагательные
свойства действий, как наречия
предметы или признаки, как местоимения
Иными словами, они не несут собственного значения, а лишь подчеркивают, выделяют или уточняют значение других слов:

Did the doctor come yet?
Доктор еще не пришел?
(yet – наречие)

Our neighbors have yet another quarrel.
У наших соседей еще одна ссора.
(yet – частица)
The plane has just taken off.
Самолет только что взлетел.
(just – наречие)

Just don’t give up.
Только не сдавайся.
(just – частица)

@темы: Vocabulary, Particle, Grammar, English

22:31 

Частицы в английском языке

Частица – это служебная часть речи, которая придает словам дополнительные оттенки значения или ограничивает его

Частицы в английском языке не изменяются и не имеют грамматических категорий, а также не являются членами предложения.

Английские частицы можно разделить на следующие смысловые группы:

Выделительно-ограничительные (limiting particles) - even, only, merely, solely, just, but, alone
Такие частицы подчеркивают некое слово или ограничивают выражаемую им идею:

This project is merely a beginning.
Этот проект – всего лишь начало.

I only wanted to make clear several details.
Я лишь хотел прояснить несколько деталей.

Усилительные (intensifying particles) - even, yet, still, all, just, simply, never
Они усиливают значение соответствующего слова или подчеркивают его значимость:

Our clients demand still higher output.
Наши клиенты требуют еще большей производительности.

We have just a little bit more to go.
Нам осталось идти совсем чуть-чуть.

Уточнительные (specifying particles) - just, right, exactly, precisely
Данный тип частиц конкретизирует значение соответствующего слова:

Stand right on this white line.
Встаньте прямо на этой белой линии.

Everyone must be here precisely at 10.
Все должны быть здесь ровно в 10 часов.

Отрицательная частица (negative particle) not:
Not a soul here.
Здесь нет ни души.

Not all my books were successful.
Не все мои книги были успешными.

Дополняющая частица (additive particle) else.
Данная частица означает, что соответствующее ей слово дополняет нечто уже упомянутое в разговоре:

Do you have anything else to add?
Вы можете добавить что-нибудь еще?

What else can we do to help you?
Что еще мы можем сделать, чтобы помочь тебе?
Как видите, обычно английские частицы ставятся перед словами, к которым они относятся, реже они следуют за ними:

Everyone has helped us, even completely unfamiliar people.
Нам помогали все, даже совершенно незнакомые люди.

During February alone our losses made $1 mln.
Только за февраль наши убытки составили 1 миллион долларов.

@темы: Particle, Grammar, English, Vocabulary

22:03 

19 Digital Tools to Build Vocabulary

19 Digital Tools to Build Vocabulary
Reference Tools
1. Lingro
Lingro is a cool tool for both the “wow” factor and for its usefulness. Simply type in a website address on the Lingro website and it instantly turns the website into a clickable dictionary that translates text in 12 languages. Lingro hides in the background until students need it. To use, students simply click on any word and several definitions of the word are instantly displayed. I could see this as very useful tool for just-in-time support for English language learners.

2. Lexipedia
Looking for a visual thesaurus? Then Lexipedia is for you. Simple to use. Just type in any word and Lexipedia instantly displays the target word along with other words. It also color-codes the words by both parts of speech and relationships. As you hover over a word, a complete definition is displayed.

3. Shahi
Shahi, as described on the website, is a visual dictionary that combines Wiktionary content with Flickr images, and more! An absolute new favorite for me. Besides serving as a nonlinguistic tool, I can also see this as a very useful tool for English language learners.

4. Snappy Words
Similar to Lexipedia, Snappy Words is another visual thesaurus. Teachers may want to introduce several of the thesaurus tools and allow students to select which works best for them. The visually sparse, cleaner display of Lexipedia works better for me.

5. Visual Dictionary Online
Check out Webster’s visual dictionary which is simple to use. Type in a single word or choose a theme that also includes many sub-categories from which to choose. Even though Webster’s is simple to use, there is a downside to this tool. After typing in a word search, 4 or 5 Google ads quickly appear above the definitions. Distracting. Yuk. It’s so clunky I almost didn’t include this tool.

6. Word Hippo
An all-in-one reference tool, Word Hippo does the following: defines a word, provides a meaning, provides a word that is opposite, pronounces a word, provides rhyming words, places the word in many different contexts, and translates the word. Whew! That’s a lot.

7. Wordnik
Wordnik has the look and feel of a traditional dictionary with a twist. Along with the definition, students can see images related to the word, hear related sounds, and even see tweets with the target word highlighted. The “related words” feature is particularly helpful. Wordnik also features a “Word of the Day,” “Random Words,” and pronunciations of words.

8. Your Dictionary
Your Dictionary bills itself as providing simple, straightforward definitions and the easiest-to-use online dictionary. That’s about right. Sometimes simple is good. In addition to providing a definition, Your Dictionary also includes a thesaurus and places the word in varied sentence examples.

9. MathWords
Math Words is a simple-to-use online dictionary specifically for math terms and formulas. This dictionary appears most appropriate for intermediate and secondary students.

10. Wordle
Type (or copy & paste) in a chunk of text or individual words and Wordle generates a word cloud of the key vocabulary based on word frequency. Wordle can also be used for many varied purposes – check out these 52 ideas for using Wordle to support learning.

11. WordSift
Similar to Wordle, students type (or copy & paste) in a piece of text and WordSift sorts the text based on word frequency. The visual thesaurus that displays beneath the words is a nice addition in WordSift. With the visual thesaurus, students immediately see how words are grouped semantically.

Games and Review
12. Flashcard Stash
While I think that flash cards are sometimes poor practice, students can benefit from instant recognition. Fluency, if you will, with a specific set of words. Now, if understanding doesn’t go deeper than instant recognition, students are in trouble. Teachers can sign up for a free account and create flashcards to coordinate with units of study.

13. Vocabulary Games
While I’m not a fan of word searches for review or “seatwork,” this website also includes a wide assortment of other vocabulary games that can be used on a SmartBoard for review purposes. To make a tool like this more effective, be certain to review the meaning of words as students play games.

14. Vocabulary Spelling City
A beefed-up version of vocabulary games, Vocabulary Spelling City includes many more game-like activities useful for reviewing words. A number of teacher-made lists are included such as analogies, compound words, math words, and many more. The free version seems to include about 5 activities and teachers can save lists. “Teach Me” pronounces words and uses each word in context. Teachers can use pre-selected sentences or create their own. Vocabulary Spelling City is a useful tool for students, teachers, and parents. While there is both a free and paid version, Vocabulary Spelling City seems like a natural for PTA funding. The classroom paid version allows students to practice in school and at home as well.

15. VocabAhead
VocabAhead is a useful tool for secondary students and teachers. Short videos – 30 to 60 seconds – accompany each word and make this tool stand out among others for secondary students. The Study Lounge, for students, features leveled word lists (grades 6-12) and SAT word lists. Students can view videos, hear pronunciations, practice, take quizzes, play games, track performance, and more. In addition, teachers can create their own word lists for students. Custom word lists can be embedded in a blog or class website which makes integration and review a snap. Apple and Android apps are also available for free download.

16. Free Rice
At Free Rice, students can practice matching words to the correct definition, and donate rice at the same time. For each correct answer, the United Nations World Food Programme donates 10 grains of rice to a country in need. How’s that for combining word learning with social goodness? When a student plays, there is a visual display of rice (see image) which is added to a bowl each time the student makes a correct response. Free Rice includes subject area lists in Geography, Science, Math, and others. It is leveled so students can play at just the right level of challenge for them. Note of caution: Free Rice may be addicting to you and your students.

Word Walls & Virtual Field Trips
17. Padlet
Padlet is an online space to create a collaborative, digital word wall. Getting a leg up on the more traditional word wall, Padlet allows users to create sticky notes that can include text, images, links and videos. Teachers can embed this into a classroom website or blog which makes it a go-to collaborative space for students. For primary students, teachers will probably want to create the wall with words and links for students. Older students will get the hang of it fairly quickly. A great, collaborative tool and virtual classroom space to build online references and key vocabulary for content units.

18. ThingLink
ThingLink is a tool for making images interactive. To use, simply upload an image, identify hot spots on specific parts of the image, and add text or web links to the image. In the classroom, teachers could use ThingLink to launch a unit by introducing students to key vocabulary or students could design interactive images as they become more familiar with vocabulary. There are many possibilities; I’d love to know how you use ThingLink to extend and deepen student learning.

19. TrackStar
TrackStar, a free online program, allows teachers to collect a series of websites and annotate them so that students can follow an online journey. With a little work, teachers can create a visual vocabulary field trip for students. Teachers determine topics which support units of study. TrackStar is a great way for students to experience multiple exposures to words in varied contexts (a characteristic of effective vocabulary instruction).
Do you have a favorite digital tool that you use to foster word learning with your students? Have I missed any that you love? Let me know in the comments.

@темы: ESL, links, Vocabulary

21:54 

Vocabulary learning



www.memrise.com/

How does Memrise work?

Find a course that you like


There are thousands of courses on Memrise - all free and all created by other members of the community. Courses are available in many languages, for many languages and other subjects. If we don't have what you want, join in and make your own!

Learn effectively

Learn the course using our science-based learning techniques. Bring learning to life with mems - little snippets of imagination and humour that make things easy to remember.

Have fun

Earn points whilst you learn, and compete against friends. Thanks to our spaced repetition scheme you'll practice items you've learnt before again in the future - earn more points for remembering them for longer lengths of time.

@темы: links, Vocabulary, English, ESL

21:11 

Why learning language is important?

Living environment - Warehouse 14

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