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Записи с темой: english (список заголовков)
10:21 

English Grammar Website

www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar
Полезный сайт как для преподавателей, так и для изучающих язык.
Что важно: помимо теории, которая есть практически на каждом сайте, здесь есть еще и упражнения, причем в достаточном количестве. Упражнения на лексику тоже есть, но их довольно мало.
Уровень - где-то до Pre-Intermediate/Imtermediate

From the creators: "We put our first exercises online in April 2000. Our target group: just a handful of students to whom we were giving private tuition then. A year later, we were very surprised to find that our exercises were used by approx. 20 visitors per day. They found our sites via search engines. This encouraged us to offer more exercises on the internet and in August 2001 we started ego4u. Now we have approx. 45,000 users per day, lots of them are regular visitors."

@темы: links, exercises, Grammar, English, ESL

14:51 

Discussion points - Fads and Trends

Fads and Trends

What is a fad?
Do you pay attention to fads?
What were some fads when you were in high school?
What were some fads when you were in college?
What are some fads now?
Are fads the same as popular culture?
What are some of the fads in your home country? Are they the same as where you are living now?
Why do you think people pay attention to fads?
What fad influence your life the most?
What portion of the general population do you think creates or follows fads?
How do fads start and who starts them? Today? In the past?
What media influences how fads evolve?
If you wanted to start a trend, how would you go about it?
How long does it take for a fad to die out?
What are the current trends in fashion?
What are the current trends in electronics?
What are the current trends in music, books, or movies?
What are the current trends in dating/relationships?
How do you learn about the current trends?
Are there any current trends you don't like?
Are there any trends from the past you hope come back?
Are there any trends from the past you hope never come back?
What sorts of trends do you think will develop in the near future?
Name a trend that you followed.
What is a fad diet? Can you name any?
What is a yo-yo diet?
Have you ever tried a fad diet?
Do you count calories? Do you think counting calories is a good way to lose weight?
Do you ever eat or drink "diet" products, such as diet coke?
Have you ever tried a weight loss program?
Was it successful?
Do your parents talk about fads "in their day"?
What fads or trends do you remember from the 80's, 90's or any other time period?

iteslj.org/questions/fads.html

@темы: topics, links, Trends, English, ESL

13:12 

Travelling and Tourism

10:29 

Podcasts - Why factor - Relationship

Monogamy
Around the world people have different rules for their relationships - rules often dictated by culture and religion. In many societies the most important of these is sexual fidelity - true love and monogamy are expected to go hand in hand - but why should love mean forsaking all others? And what happens to relationships when monogamy is cast adrift?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01f89zy

@темы: English, Listening, Podcasts, Relationship, Why Factor

15:52 

Writing - Graph Discription

Types of Graphs
Line Graph (vertical axis/y-axis; horizontal axis/x-axis, solid line/curve, dotted line/curve)
Bar Chart
Pie Chart
Flow Chart
Table
Diagram

Movement (Verbs): Up
Rise
Raise smth
Go up
Increase
Grow
Shot up
Surge
Rocket
Improve
Boom
Put up
Push up
Step up
Extend
Expand
Double
Shoot Up
Soar
Jump
Leap


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@темы: Writing, TED, Graphs, English

11:56 

Podcasts - Why factor - Privacy/Solitude/Silence

Privacy
Although we assume a natural right to privacy, we readily give it away on our mobile phones and on social media websites. So as technology alters the very definition of what privacy is and the science of surveillance becomes ever more acute, is the idea of privacy little more than a quaint last-century notion? Mike Williams traces its history, and ponders what a society without privacy might look like.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01sn53y

Solitude

Solitude - time on our own – has had a bad press. It’s certainly becoming more common in many parts of the globe, as seen in the increasing numbers choosing to live alone. But it’s easily confused with loneliness, or demonised as weird or threatening in the form of ‘the loner’.
So how far can or should we pursue solitude? How does it relate to our hyper-connected world?
We hear from a ‘semi-hermit’ on how she lives her life, a survivor of solitary confinement who also feared compulsory company, a champion of ‘the loner’s manifesto’ and an expert on global solo living.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01llw5q

Silence
What role does silence play in our increasingly noisy lives? Why can silences be so poignant or so awkward? Strangely for radio, the programme will contain lots of silence… and the thoughts of musicians, scientists, religious thinkers and others.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0155cg3

@темы: English, Human, Listening, Podcasts, Relationship, Why Factor, links

22:31 

Podcasts - Why factor - Age

Ageing
Why are attitudes towards older people often so negative? Traditional definitions used to mark old age at around retirement - 60– 65 years. But with many of us expected to live well into our 80s and beyond, that now seems absurd. Mike Williams talks to the old and the young, and asks how might we re-think of this period of our lives ?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01cbxdp

Retirement

The idea of retirement is historically new. But with widespread demographic changes now meaning that many of us are expected to live into our eighties and beyond, how much sense does it make to stop people working when they reach their mid-sixties? Mike Williams looks at retirement asks how we might re-think this period of our lives.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0164619

Adolescence
In the West, teenagers are commonly perceived as being volatile, moody and often seen as being “trouble”. Why? Well, because they are teenagers. All that growing, all those changes. But in recent years scientists have discovered that changes to the brain, which occur during puberty, make young people less able to control their emotions and result in different attitudes towards risk as compared to adults. Can these changes to the brain explain why adolescence can be such a difficult period of our lives? Or is adolescence a manufactured cultural concept we’ve invented?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01r3lbg

Coming of Age
Why do different cultures have different coming of ages? For some the advent of adulthood is celebrated by lavish parties, for others, by endurance tests and initiation ceremonies. But they all share acommonality - the symbolic passing of childhood into the adult world which usually confers new rights: legal, political or religious.
But what really changes? And why is adolescence, for many, lasting longer than ever?
NB! contains the language that some may find offensive

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0104jqr

@темы: Aging, English, Human, Listening, Podcasts, Why Factor, links

22:13 

Podcasts - Why factor - 'I'm a mere human, with feelings...'

Honour
People have fought for honour and died for it. People have murdered others because of it. Why is this notion so powerful and so lasting? In this edition we examine the honour-codes of the Japanese samurai, we explore honour in the works of William Shakespeare and look at the persistence of so-called honour killings.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02f8m9w

Loyalty
Who are you loyal to? Your family, partner, employer? Why? Mike Williams talks to people whose loyalty has been challenged – from the wife of an unfaithful husband, to a doctor who blew the whistle on her employers. Are we ultimately only really loyal to ourselves?
A Catholic priest argues that it is better to be committed to values than loyal to superiors. Mike also hears how loyalty can be created to get people to kill – such as in the military.

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02gmpbn

Embarrassment
A knot in the stomach, a blush to the face, a wish that the ground would swallow us up and end our misery. We’ve all experienced embarrassment and wished it would never happen again.
But why do experience these feelings and what do they mean? Mike Williams asks psychotherapist Philippa Perry to explain embarrassment and what it says about us and how other people see us.
Dr Jieyu Liu, deputy director of the China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, tells Mike how the different generations in China view the reasons for embarrassment and how far it differs from “loss of face”. She also discusses how it is possible to feel embarrassed for “the nation”.
And former top cricketer and sports commentator, Ed Smith, reveals how sportsmen and women deal with embarrassment and whether it can be managed for better performance and results.

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p028v4lv

Risking Life For Strangers
Why would someone risk their life for a stranger? Why would a 54-year-old Englishwoman leave her home, her son, her grandchildren and travel nearly 5000 miles (8000 km) to the Ebola hot-zone of West Africa? Why did Cokie van der Velde do it twice? And why is she doing it again?
The deadly Ebola virus has spread through West Africa and threatens to spread further. It has claimed nearly 2,500 lives. The World Health Organisation says the health crisis is unparalleled in modern times, and that the death toll could eventually be in the tens of thousands. The United States has plans to send up to 3000 troops to help combat the epidemic.
On the Why Factor this week, Cokie van der Velde tells Mike Williams about conditions on a Liberian Ebola ward and about the fear she feels as she cleans bodily fluids from the floors and puts the victims into body-bags. It’s an experience which has forced her to reassess her attitude to death - the death of her patients and her own.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026j78c

Envy
Why do we envy other people? Mike Williams meets a woman who is experiencing severe ‘baby envy’ because she cannot have a child. He explores the role envy plays in literature, whether social media makes us all more envious and if the emotion - often considered dangerously destructive - can sometimes be a force for good.

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01vzjrz

Optimism and Pessimism
Dr Michael Mosley, a self-proclaimed 'proud pessimist', says that given a choice he would prefer to be an optimist, as pessimism affects his relationships and optimists tend to live longer. So he recently agreed to try and convert his darker outlook on life to a brighter one. Over seven weeks, his brain was manipulated by psychologists at Oxford University for a BBC documentary in order to try to turn Dr Mosley into an optimist. He reports back on the success or otherwise of the experiment. But do we have a choice? Ros Taylor says we do. Once a pessimistic average opera singer, she realised that her real passion in life was psychology. She retrained to become a clinical psychologist and claims to have taught herself to become a 'pragmatic optimist'.
Mike Williams puts optimist Ros Taylor up against pessimist Michael Mosley to ask if the glass should be half-full or half-empty and why should we care?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01kqbm7

The Lie

We all do it… don’t we? If your answer is no perhaps you’re doing it right now.
Many psychologists argue that learning to lie is an important stage for children. As early as two, children who are moredevelopmentally advanced are much better liars. For some people, lying is something they can’t stop doing. We hear from someone whose life spiralled out of control due to her addiction to lying.
But is every lie bad? The concept of a ‘white lie’ is one we teach our children from an early age but different societies socialise their children to tell different sorts of lies. East Asian societies might be more aware of a ‘blue lie’ for example.
Mike Williams explore how different cultures define telling the truth and what that shows us about our societies.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01kb0cc

The Lie
Many psychologists argue that learning to lie is an important stage for children. As early as two, children who are more developmentally advanced are much better liars. For some people, lying is something they can’t stop doing. We hear from someone whose life spiralled out of control due to her addiction to lying.
But is every lie bad? The concept of a ‘white lie’ is one we teach our children from an early age but different societies socialise their children to tell different sorts of lies. East Asian societies might be more aware of a ‘blue lie’ for example.
We explore how different cultures define telling the truth and what that shows us about our societies.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0188dbq

Bullying
Why do humans bully, why do some do it and others allow it? Are bullies born or do they learn their bullying? Mike Williams speaks to anthropologist Christopher Boehm about links between the bullying behaviour of our ape ancestors and our own behaviour. He also speaks to author Helene Guldberg about the challenges defining the term as well as performance poet Shane Koyczan about his experience being both bullied and being a bully.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01jlr3z

Nostalgia
Why do we look back and yearn for the past, longing for some golden age when society was supposedly simple, innocent and kind? Why do we recall sweet memories of our youth? And the bitter-sweet memories of love and loss?
Mike Williams speaks to a social psychologist who reveals that looking to the past can protect us in a number of surprising ways. He hears from a woman from the former German Democratic Republic who waxes nostalgic about life there. And he meets a man born in the 1970s who spends most of his time living in the 1940s.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01h2s9h


Disgust
Disgust is something that we all experience, but what purpose does it serve? And what role does it play in our moral judgements?
Mike Williams speaks to the ‘disgustologist’ Val Curtis about how revulsion protects us from disease and learns how disgust can be used – and abused - as a political weapon.
He tests the limits of his own disgust, finds out what it’s like to be the object of someone else’s disgust and explores the idea that there is “wisdom in repugnance” with philosopher Steve Clarke.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p017zs6g

PTSD
This week we’ll explore Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - PTSD. What is it? And why is it so controversial?
Many people in the world are exposed to extraordinary, traumatic events- wars, earthquakes, accidents and crime. Most recover in time but, for some, the trauma takes over their lives, leaving them unable to function.
Mike Williams talks to a war veteran and a tsunami survivor, who tell their stories of how they came to be diagnosed with PTSD. But do the public know what this diagnosis really is? Or has it been confused with a broader term for anyone who has suffered a trauma? Is it a useful diagnosis across cultures?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p014vrks

Fear - Episode 1
In the first of two programmes on fear, we ask what actually fear is and discover it's a surprisingly difficult question to answer. What does fear mean to us and how do we face our fears, imaginary or otherwise? Are our fears universal or culturally specific?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p010z9xw

Fear - Episode 2
This week the second of two programmes about fear, why do some of us like to be frightened? Why, in a darkened cinema, do we enjoy and endure fear, horror and suspense? We'll delve into the human mind to find out.
We will also go behind the camera to learn how the film-makers manipulate our senses and play on our deepest, most primeval fears.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p011cdxy

Why do we laugh?
At first glance, it seems like a very obvious basic human response - we laugh because we find things amusing. But what is it that actually triggers our laughter, do all of us find the same things funny?
In the edition of The Why Factor, we also look beyond comedy, at laughter in our everyday lives and the role it plays in the relationships between men and women.
We also hear some surprising and disturbing discoveries. Why, for instance, were those who carried out the massacre at Columbine laughing as they shot dead 13 people?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00z561s

Crying
Crying emotional tears is uniquely human. We cry over almost anything and for almost any reason – from tears of sadness to tears of joy. Music can induce them, films, stories and television news too. We do not produce tears when we are first born – it takes a few months until we are able to. But once we can, we do it right up until our final days. So why do we cry? Mike Williams traces some of the competing theories of tears with the help of scientists, psychologists, and a historian. He also watches as an actress is made to cry by her acting coach.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01mhvnm

@темы: links, Why Factor, Relationship, Podcasts, Personality&Character, Listening, English

15:19 

Podcasts - Why factor - Art

Portrait Photography
From the first photographic portraits captured in the 1830s to the “selfies” of today, we seem fascinated by images of the human face. Mike Williams asks if it is simple vanity or something deeper; perhaps an attempt to learn how other people see us or a desire to capture something of ourselves that may live on when we are gone.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02g0cmg

Singing
It’s something that all individuals and societies have done for millions of years. But why do we sing? Today singing is a way of bringing people together, expressing joy, sadness and almost every emotion. Is there an evolutionary reason why and how humans developed the complex vocal structures involved in singing?
Mike Williams talks to biologists, voice coaches and vocalists to find out.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01727f0

Tattoos
In this programme, Mike Williams asks why people have tattoos. Where do they come from and what do they say about us? From the Maori of New Zealand to the Mexican Mafia, Mike explores the universal motivation behind why people decorate their bodies with ink.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01c0qnz

Dance
Dance exists in every culture. It’s thought that humans were dancing before we learned to speak.
But why do we have this desire to move, and what are we trying to communicate? Mike Williams explores the idea of ‘muscular bonding’ – that moving together creates communities. He hears how Indian Kathak dance connects body and soul, how a Northern Australian society uses dance to blur gender divides, and how watching others dance makes us move too.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01v2hm6

Sticky Songs
What makes snippets of popular songs go round and round in our heads? Which songs are likely to be earworms or 'sticky songs' and what sort of person is most susceptible to them? If an earworm is driving you mad, how do you get rid of it? And what might the wider mental health benefits be of understanding where the mind goes when we let it off the leash?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01ycqg1

Sad Music
Helena Merriman asks why people listen to sad music. A recent study has shown that sad music has become increasingly popular, but why do people choose to listen to it, and what goes on in the brain and the body when they do so?
Helena speaks to Japanese pianist and music researcher Dr Ai Kawakami who has some surprising answers about some of the positive feelings people experience when they listen to sad music. American writer Amanda Stern tells Helena why she regularly listens (and cries) to sad music and British composer Debbie Wiseman, known for her moving TV and film scores, explains what makes a piece of music sound sad.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01gmhx6

@темы: Why Factor, Podcasts, Listening, English, Art, links

18:29 

100+ Self-Education Resources For Lifelong Learners

There are so many incredible resources for self-education and lifelong learning online. Learn something new everyday!
www.diygenius.com/100-self-education-resources-...

@темы: English, languages, links

00:05 

General links - Idioms

19:59 

Vocabulary - Personality&Character

A
active = always doing something: "She's an active person and never wants to stay in."

aggressive = being angry or threatening: "He's aggressive and starts arguments."

ambitious = wanting to succeed: "He's ambitious and wants to lead the company."

argumentative = always arguing with people: "He won't accept what you say – he's argumentative and loves to disagree!"

arrogant = thinking you are better than anyone else: "He always behaves as if nobody else's opinion is important – "I find him very arrogant."

assertive = being confident, so people can't force you to do things you don't want to do: "It's important to be assertive at work."

B
bad-tempered = in a bad mood: "What's got into him lately? He's so bad-tempered."

big-headed = thinking you're very important or clever: "I've never met anyone so big-headed!"

bossy = telling people what to do all the time: "He's so bossy - he never lets me do things the way I want to do them."

C
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@темы: English, Personality&Character, Vocabulary

19:55 

Marriage and wedding vocabulary

Marriage and wedding vocabulary
It all starts with a proposal. Traditionally the man goes down on one knee to pop the question.

If he receives a "yes", the couple are engaged. It is customary for the man to buy his fiancee an engagement ring, most commonly a diamond ring. Engagements can last for years, and if neither of the couple breaks off the engagement, the next step is marriage.

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@темы: English, Vocabulary, Relationship

19:45 

Love idioms

Falling in love
catch someone's eye = to be attractive to someone: "The shy man at the back of the class caught my eye."

to fancy someone (British English) = to find someone attractive: "My friend fancies you!"

to have a crush on someone = to only be able to think about one person: "When I was at school, I had a crush on a film star."

to have a soft spot for someone = to have a weakness for someone: "She has a soft spot for Richard – he can do anything!"

to have the hots for someone = to find someone very attractive: "She's got the hots for the new office manager."

to go out with someone (British English) = to date someone: "They've been going out together for years!"

to go steady = to go out with someone: "They've been going steady since their first year at university."

to fall for someone = to fall in love: "He always falls for the wrong types!"

to fall head over heels for someone = to completely fall in love: "He fell head over heels for her."

to be lovey-dovey = for a couple to show everyone how much they are in love: "They're so lovey-dovey, always whispering to each other and looking into each other's eyes."

to have eyes only for = to be attracted to one person only: "He's dropped all his old friends, now that he has eyes only for Susie."

to be the apple of someone's eye = to be loved by someone, normally an older relative: "She's the apple of her father's eye."

to be smitten by someone = to be in love with someone: "I first met him at a party and from that evening on, I was smitten."

a love-nest = the place where two lovers live: "They made a love-nest in the old basement flat."

to be loved-up (British English) = to exist in a warm feeling of love: "They are one loved-up couple!"

to be the love of someone's life = to be loved by a person: "He has always been the love of her life."

Types of love
puppy love = love between teenagers: "It's just puppy love – you'll grow out of it!"

cupboard love = love for someone because they give you food: "I think my cat loves me, but it's only cupboard love!"

Getting married
to get hitched: "They're getting hitched next Saturday."

to tie the knot: "So when are you two tying the knot?"

If it goes wrong…
to go through a bit of a rough patch = when things are not going well: "Since the argument, they've been going through a bit of a rough patch."

to have blazing rows = to have big arguments: "We had a blazing row last night."

can't stand the sight of someone = to not like someone: "She can't stand the sight of him any more!"

to call it a day = to agree that the relationship has ended: "We decided to call it a day."

to be on the rocks = a relationship that is in difficulty: "Once she moved out, it was clear their marriage was on the rocks."

to have a stormy relationship = a relationship with many arguments: "I'm glad we don't have a stormy relationship."

a love-rat = a man who betrays his girlfriend / wife: "He's had affairs with three different women – he's a complete love-rat."

Sayings
Marry in haste, repent at leisure = if you marry too quickly, you have the rest of your life to regret it!

Love is blind = when you love someone, you can't see their faults

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder = beauty is subjective

Let your heart rule your head = allow your emotions to control your rational side

Wear your heart on your sleeve = show other people how you are feeling

See also our page on marriage and wedding vocabulary for more words a

@темы: Vocabulary, Relationship, Personality&Character, Idioms&Expressions, English

19:23 

Relationship idioms

Relationship idioms


Positive
get on like a house on fire = to get on really well with someone: "They get on like a house on fire."

have a soft spot for someone = to be very fond of someone: "She has a soft spot for her youngest child."

go back a long way = to know someone well for a long time: "Those two go back a long way. They were at primary school together."

be in with = to have favoured status with someone: "She's in with the management."

Negative
get off on the wrong foot with someone = to start off badly with someone: "She really got off on the wrong foot with her new boss."

keep someone at arm's length = to keep someone at a distance: "I'm keeping her at arm's length for the time being."

they're like cat and dog = to often argue with someone: "Those two are like cat and dog."

rub someone up the wrong way = to irritate someone: "She really rubs her sister up the wrong way."

be at loggerheads = to disagree strongly: "Charles and Henry are at loggerheads over the new policy."

sworn enemies = to hate someone: "Those two are sworn enemies."

Equality and inequality
bend over backwards for someone = do everything possible to help someone: "She bent over backwards for them when they first arrived in the town."

be at someone's beck and call = to always be ready to do what someone wants: "As the office junior, she was at his beck and call all day."

pull your weight = to do the right amount of work: "The kids always pull their weight around the house."

do your fair share = to do your share of the work: "He never does his fair share!"

take someone under your wing = to look after someone until they settle in: "He took her under his wing for her first month at work."

keep tabs on someone = to watch someone carefully to check what they are doing: "He's keeping tabs on the sales team at the moment."

wear the trousers = to be in control: "She wears the trousers in their relationship."

be under the thumb = to be controlled by someone else: "He really keeps her under the thumb."

How you communicate
get your wires crossed =to misunderstand someone because you think they are talking about something else: "I think I've got my wires crossed. Were you talking about car or personal insurance?"

get the wrong end of the stick = to misunderstand someone and understand the opposite of what they are saying: "You've got the wrong end of the stick. The fault was with the other driver, not with me."

be left in the dark = to be left without enough information: "We've been left in the dark over this project. We haven't been told how to do it."

talk at cross purposes = when two people don't understand each other because they are talking about two different things (but don't realise it): "We're talking at cross purposes here."

go round in circles = to say the same things over and again, so never resolving a problem: "We always end up going round in circles in these meetings."

leave things up in the air = to leave something undecided: "I hate leaving things up in the air."

@темы: Vocabulary, Relationship, Personality&Character, Idioms&Expressions, English

11:49 

General links - synonyms, rhymes, abbreviations

www.woxikon.com/

"Woxikon started out as a mere dictionary but evolved into a large lexicon of translations, synonyms, rhymes, abbreviations and much more.

Woxikon is a multilingual dictionary and lexicon of translations, synonyms and abbreviations. The online translator can translate between German, English, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Dutch, Swedish, Russian, Polish, Finnish, Norwegian and Turkish, and it may be used free of charge. It is continually being expanded.

Moreover, Woxikon offers conjugation tables and explanatory notes on grammar. We recommend their use as a supplement to the dictionary.

Woxikon offers foreign-language enthusiasts a wealth of possibilities for developing and improving their language skills."

@темы: general links, Vocabulary, Linguistics, English, словари

11:28 

General links - сайты и ссылки про этимологию, слова и их распространие

1. www.ezglot.com

"We all know little bit of foreign languages, even if we are not aware of it. Reason is simple: languages have many words in common. The more words two languages have in common, the more lexically similar they are, and more mutually intelligible.
EZGlot helps anyone appear to be a polyglot, by showing you which common words in foreign languages you already know, so that you can jump start your communication when traveling abroad. We show you words that not only look or sound similar, but also have similar meaning.
~90 languages, Gigabytes of data, months of algorithm development, weeks of computation. They call it Big Data. We used science, open source projects, custom graph analysis and lexical similarity algorithms, a number of iterations in search of a solution. A rich graph of relations between words in dozens of world languages contains many interesting insights, but also a lot of noise. While providing insights, we tried to reduce the noise. You can tell us whether we succeeded."

2. www.reddit.com/r/etymologymaps
список ссылок, разные языки

3. www.lexvo.org
Lexvo.org brings information about languages, words, characters, and other human language-related entities to the Linked Data Web and Semantic Web. The Linked Data Web is a worldwide initiative to create a Web of Data that exposes the relationships between entities in our world. Lexvo.org adds a new perspective to this Web by exposing how everything in our world is connected in terms of language, e.g. by considering semantic relationships between multilingual labels (like book or New York). Lexvo not only defines global IDs (URIs) for language-related objects, but also ensures that these identifiers are dereferenceable and highly interconnected as well as externally linked to a variety of resources on the Web.

4. www.lexvo.com
Words and their relationships

5. www.wordinfo.info
Latin and Greek cross refecences - A Dictionary of English Vocabulary Words Derived Primarily from Latin and Greek Sources, Presented Individually and in Family Units

@темы: links, general links, Vocabulary, Linguistics, English

11:04 

Word roots and mind maps

Сайт с лексикой. Слова организованы по ассоциациям - всем известныe Mind Maps, и по корням - интерактивно и с подкастом, в котором рассказывается про значение этого корня и про производные.
про корни - membean.com/educator/wordroots - внизу страницы ссылки на архив, пока там 112 корней
mind maps - membean.com/educator/wordmaps


@темы: links, Vocabulary, Mind Maps, English

10:50 

Personality&Character Podcasts

describing people (Elementary) - www.eslgold.com/speaking/describing_people.html

Describing People’s Personalities (PreInt - Int?) www.eslpod.com/website/show_podcast.php?issue_i...

Feeling Embarrassed - www.eslpod.com/website/show_podcast.php?issue_i...

Describing People (& Character) (Int) - zappenglish.com/english-listening-describing-pe...
"In this audio class about describing people you have the chance to take a personality test, as well as hearing what different people think are good characteristics and bad characteristics (of people’s characters). We’ll hear what makes a good friend and a good boss. What do you think? You’ll also be reminded of some common adjectives for describing character. Five different speakers give their opinions and you will have the chance to listen to Canadian, British and American accents."

Describing People & Character (Int) - zappenglish.com/colloquial-english-describing-p...
"When we talk about our friends or people we know in English, we use a lot of informal language. In this colloquial audio class you’ll learn some common ways to talk about, and describe the people around you. You’ll learn some new informal expressions for describing people and their character. Find out why somebody could be a dark horse. Are you bonkers? By the end of this podcast you’ll know!"

Finding Your Tribe - www.personalityhacker.com/podcast-episode-0024-...
the speakers talk about finding your tribe and how to make friends.

Finding Your Passion - www.personalityhacker.com/podcast-episode-0015-...

Myers Briggs Personality Types - www.personalityhacker.com/podcast-episode-0020-...

Personality and criticism (UpperInt) podcasts.personallifemedia.com/podcasts/214-pur...
"...the ways that criticism and self-criticism interfere with our ability to find our life purpose and live as strongly, passionately, and effectively as we would like to live."

Emotions - www.personalityhacker.com/podcast-0008/
"emotions… how we express them and often smuggle them when they are unpleasant"

Personality Styles (general topic - business, teambuilding, leadership) <podbay.fm/show/435836905/e/1334034000?autostart...

@темы: Podcasts, Personality&Character, English, links

12:59 

English Morphological Parser


nlpdotnet.com/Services/Morphparser.aspx

это сайт, который будет интересен скорее филологам\лингвистам, хотя, в целом, полезная вещь)
Оглавление:
Free NLP Online Services
Part-of-speech tagging
English concordancing
Tokenizing
Morphological parsing
Verb classifying
Linguistic Fingerprinting
Introduction to linguistics
Definitive Features of Language
Phonetics
Speech sound overview
Description of consonants
Chart of consonants
Description of vowels
Chart of monophthongs
Chart of diphthongs
Phonology
Phoneme and Allophones
Visual Studio Tutorials
Nlp Sample Code
My Technical Blogs

@темы: links, Linguistics, English

Living environment - Warehouse 14

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