of light and shadows
Ageing
Why are attitudes towards older people often so negative? Traditional definitions used to mark old age at around retirement - 60– 65 years. But with many of us expected to live well into our 80s and beyond, that now seems absurd. Mike Williams talks to the old and the young, and asks how might we re-think of this period of our lives ?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01cbxdp

Retirement

The idea of retirement is historically new. But with widespread demographic changes now meaning that many of us are expected to live into our eighties and beyond, how much sense does it make to stop people working when they reach their mid-sixties? Mike Williams looks at retirement asks how we might re-think this period of our lives.
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0164619

Adolescence
In the West, teenagers are commonly perceived as being volatile, moody and often seen as being “trouble”. Why? Well, because they are teenagers. All that growing, all those changes. But in recent years scientists have discovered that changes to the brain, which occur during puberty, make young people less able to control their emotions and result in different attitudes towards risk as compared to adults. Can these changes to the brain explain why adolescence can be such a difficult period of our lives? Or is adolescence a manufactured cultural concept we’ve invented?
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01r3lbg

Coming of Age
Why do different cultures have different coming of ages? For some the advent of adulthood is celebrated by lavish parties, for others, by endurance tests and initiation ceremonies. But they all share acommonality - the symbolic passing of childhood into the adult world which usually confers new rights: legal, political or religious.
But what really changes? And why is adolescence, for many, lasting longer than ever?
NB! contains the language that some may find offensive

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0104jqr

@темы: Aging, English, Human, Listening, Podcasts, Why Factor, links